Chapter 3:

Costs

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According to the CDC, smoking-related illnesses in the U.S. cost more than $300 billion dollars every year.1  This amount includes:

Picture of person balencing the costs of smoking$170 billion for direct medical care for adults and $156 billion in lost productivity each year, including $5.6 billion in lost productivity due to second-hand smoke exposure.2

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014). The Health Consequences of Smoking-50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.

2. Xu, X., Bishop, E. E., Kennedy, S. M., Simpson, S. A., & Pechacek, T. F. (2015). Annual healthcare spending attributable to cigarette smoking: An update. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 48(3), 326–333. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2014.10.012  

What could smoking cost you?

Smokers are 24% less likely to get hired than non-smokers.1 Smokers have a harder time getting hired, because smoke breaks cost employers approximately $3,077 each year due to lost productivity.2

Additionally, on average, smokers earn 20% less than non-smokers.3

1. Prochaska, J. J., Michalek, A. K., Brown-Johnson, C., Daza, E. J., Baiocchi, M., Anzai, N., Rogers, A., Grigg, M., & Chieng, A. (2016). Likelihood of Unemployed Smokers vs Nonsmokers Attaining Reemployment in a One-Year Observational Study. JAMA Internal Medicine, 176(5), 662–670. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0772  

2. Berman, M., Crane, R., Seiber, E., & Munur, M. (2013). Estimating the cost of a smoking employee. Tobacco Control, 23. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2012-050888  

3. Hotchkiss, J. L., & Pitts, M. M. (2013). Even One is Too Much: The Economic Consequences of Being a Smoker. Social Science Research Network. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2359224  

  Click the Cards to reveal.

E-cigarette Costs

E-cigarette users spend anywhere from $10–$250 a month and $120–$3000 a year at vape shops.1

Smoking Costs

In the U.S., $6.28 is the average cost for a pack of cigarettes. Smoking a pack of cigarettes (priced at $6.28) a day can cost almost $2,300 a year.2

Alternative Tobacco Costs

Consuming 1 can of dip a day can cost about $1,095 a year. Similarly, consuming 1 pouch of chewing tobacco a day can cost more than $700 a year.3

 

1. Sears, C., Hart, J., Walker, K., Lee, A., Keith, R., & Ridner, S. (2016). A Dollars and “Sense” Exploration of Vape Shop Spending and E-cigarette Use. Tobacco Prevention & Cessation, 2(Suppl). https://doi.org/10.18332/tpc/67435  

2. SmokeFree, U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.). How Much Will You Save? | Smokefree. National Cancer Institute, U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved August 25, 2020, from https://smokefree.gov/quit-smoking/why-you-should-quit/how-much-will-you-save  

3. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. (2017). Smokeless Tobacco: A Veteran’s Guide for Quitting. Veterans Health Administration. https://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/quit-tobacco...

quizonehelper

  Correct

  Wrong

According to the CDC, smoking-related illnesses in the U.S. cost more than $300 billion dollars every year.

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014). The Health Consequences of Smoking-50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.

Smoking doesn’t just affect the smoker.

Every year, 41,000 non-smokers and
400 infants die from secondhand smoke exposure.

1. Murthy, V. H. (2016). Reducing Exposure to Secondhand Smoke: Let’s Keep the Momentum Going. Public Health Reports, 131(4), 515–517.

Secondhand smoke is the smoke from burning tobacco products as well as the smoke exhaled by a person that is smoking.1

According to the CDC, "tobacco smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals, so the exposure to secondhand smoke has some of the same negative health effects as smoking such as": 2,3

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014). The Health Consequences of Smoking-50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.

2. Institute of Medicine. (2010). Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Effects: Making Sense of the Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/12649.

3. NTP (National Toxicology Program). (2016). Report on Carcinogens, Fourteenth Edition. Research Triangle Park, NC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/roc14  

drawing of a smoking heart

Heart Disease

Stroke

Brain with target on it
lungs with smoke in them

Lung Cancer 

Children and infants exposed
to secondhand smoke have
a greater risk of:

1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2006). The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.

Secondhand smoke exposure can lead to:
Secondhand smoke exposure can lead to:

quiztwohelper

  Correct

  Wrong

ALL OF THE ABOVE ARE TRUE. Secondhand smoke exposure can have some of the same negative health effects as smoking (stroke, lung cancer, heart disease, etc.), because tobacco smoke has more than 7,000 chemicals.

1. Institute of Medicine. (2010). Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Effects: Making Sense of the Evidence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/12649.

2. NTP (National Toxicology Program). (2016). Report on Carcinogens, Fourteenth Edition. Research Triangle Park, NC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/roc14  

Humans aren’t the only ones affected by smoking.
Nicotine is toxic to pets, even in small doses, but these small doses may be fatal for animals. Nicotine poisoning for pets is very serious and can happen through nicotine ingestion and inhalation. Eating one cigarette, cigar, or getting into an ashtray could cause your pet to get severely sick, or worse, die.

1. Novotny TE, Hardin SN, Hovda LR, et al. Tobacco and cigarette butt consumption in humans and animals. Tobacco Control 2011; 20(Suppl 1):i17-i20.

Humans aren’t the only ones affected by smoking.

dogs smoking

Dogs with owners who smoke are twice as likely to get cancer and have a higher risk of developing lung and nasal cancer due to secondhand smoke exposure.1

1. Oklahoma State University. (2007, September 3). Secondhand Smoke Is A Health Threat to Pets. ScienceDaily.Retrieved August 26, 2020 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070831123420.htm  

2. Bavelaar, F. J., & Beynen, A. C. (2004). Atherosclerosis in parrots. A review. The Veterinary Quarterly, 26(2), 50–60. https://doi.org/10.1080/01652176.2004.9695168  

3. Bertone ER, Snyder LA, and Moore AS. Environmental and Lifestyle Risk Factors for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Domestic Cats. J Vet Intern Med 2003; 17: 557-562.

4. Novotny, T. E., & Slaughter, E. (2014). Tobacco Product Waste: An Environmental Approach to Reduce Tobacco Consumption. Current Environmental Health Reports, 1(3), 208–216. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40572-014-0016-x  

5. Roberts, H & Palmeiro, B.S. (2008) Toxicology of Aquarium Fish. Veterinary Clinics of North America Exotic Animal Practice. 11: 359-374.

Birds living with a smoker have a higher likelihood of developing artery disease.2

Bird smoking
cats smoking

Cats with owners who smoke are also 2 to 4 times more likely to develop oral cancer.3

 

Fish can also be affected by cigarette smoke, because the smoke can get into water tanks and deposit toxic chemicals.4,5

Fish Smoking

E-cigarettes aren’t safe either.

They expose your pet to larger amounts of nicotine than cigarettes and cigars. 

ENDS products also expose your pets to formaldehyde and other toxic chemicals.

1. Forrester, M. B. (2016). Exposure of dogs to electronic cigarettes. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 248(6), 603.

2. Daily News Journal Business Brief. (2014, September 9). “Pets Poisoned by E-cigarette Liquids on Rise.” Retrieved from http://www.dnj.com/story/money/business/2014/09/09/pets-poisoned-e-cigarette-liquids-rise/15329423/

True or False.
ENDs products can expose your pets to formaldehyde and other toxic chemicals
True or False.
ENDs products can expose your pets to formaldehyde and other toxic chemicals.

quizthreehelper

  Correct

  Wrong

ENDS products aren’t safe for humans or pets. They can expose your pets to formaldehyde and other toxic chemicals.

1. Forrester, M. B. (2016). Exposure of dogs to electronic cigarettes. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 248(6), 603.

2. Daily News Journal Business Brief. (2014, September 9). “Pets Poisoned by E-cigarette Liquids on Rise.” Retrieved from http://www.dnj.com/story/money/business/2014/09/09/pets-poisoned-e-cigarette-liquids-rise/15329423/  

The Earth Can’t Clean Itself.

1. Novotny, T. E., & Slaughter, E. (2014). Tobacco Product Waste: An Environmental Approach to Reduce Tobacco Consumption. Current Environmental Health Reports, 1(3), 208–216. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40572-014-0016-x  

2. Truth Initiative. (2017, April 21). 5 ways cigarette litter impacts the environment. Truth Initiative. https://truthinitiative.org/research-resources/harmful-effects-tobacco/5-ways-cigarette-litter-impacts-environment  

3. Lecours, N., Almeida, G. E. G., Abdallah, J. M., & Novotny, T. E. (2012). Environmental health impacts of tobacco farming: A review of the literature. Tobacco Control, 21(2), 191–196. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050318  

4. Agency USEP. Chemical Report; TRI Explorer; 2015 Dataset. EPA2017.

 

 

Cigarettes are the most littered item on earth. Worldwide, 4.5 trillion cigarettes are littered each year. Cigarettes and cigarette butts are 38% of all waste products.1,2

Cigarettes pollute soil, waterways, and beaches, and they’re extremely harmful to wildlife.1,3

 

Cigarette pollution contributes significantly to deforestation and environmental degradation.1,3

In 2015, tobacco facilities disposed of 1,312,796 pounds of toxic chemicals.4

This video touches on the environmental impacts of cigarette consumption and use.

What is the most littered item on earth?
What is the most littered item on earth?

quizfourhelper

  Correct

  Wrong

Worldwide, 4.5 trillion cigarettes are littered each year. Additionally, cigarettes and cigarette butts are 38% of all waste products.

1. Novotny, T. E., & Slaughter, E. (2014). Tobacco Product Waste: An Environmental Approach to Reduce Tobacco Consumption. Current Environmental Health Reports, 1(3), 208–216. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40572-014-0016-x  

2. Truth Initiative. (2017, April 21). 5 ways cigarette litter impacts the environment. Truth Initiative. https://truthinitiative.org/research-resources/harmful-effects-tobacco/5-ways-cigarette-litter-impacts-environment  

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